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American Robin

Turdus migratorius

Order:
Passeriformes
Family:
Turdidae
Sections

Multimedia

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Photos from this Account

Adult female American Robin, Salt Lake City, UT, June.

Note plumage of this western bird is duller than that of eastern individuals. Here with earthworms, a favored prey item.  ; photographer Jerry and Sherry Liguori

Recently fledged American Robin.

Note down feather retained on head and back; this individual is about 20 days old.

American Robin clutch, Oregon.

American Robin clutch; Clackamas Co., Oregon, 12 May 1945. Ruler is in cm.; photographer Rene Corado

American Robin nest, California.

American Robin nest; Fresno Co., CA. 2 Jun 1947. Ruler is in cm.; photographer Rene Corado

American Robin nest with young about to fledge, PA, August.

, Jan 23, 2009; photographer Powdermill

Male American Robin, OH, 5 March.

One of the most familiar and widespread birds in North American, the American Robin is easily identified by its orange breast and gray upperparts. Nesting in a variety of habitats across North America, it is a common bird of suburban backyards, perhaps earning it the honor of being North America's most widely recognized bird. Males average much deeper orange on the underparts, and have darker blackish heads. The following is a link to this photographer's website: https://www.flickr.com/photos/robinarnold/.

Juvenile American Robin, Amherst, MA, 24 June.

Juvenile American Robins can cause identification confusion for birders because they appear very different from the well known plumage of adults. Juveniles hold this spotted plumage for a few months, and most acquire an adult-like plumage by the first fall. Juveniles of both sexes are similar, and first-fall birds average duller than their respective adult sexes, but ageing birds accurately relies on an assessment of molt limits in the wings. The following is a link to this photographer's website: https://www.flickr.com/photos/39177293@N03/.

Female American Robin, Goshute Mtns., NV, September.

Note overall drab plumage with white mixed into the orange underparts. ; photographer Jerry and Sherry Liguori

Male American Robin, Tompkins Co., NY, 9 April.

Note orange underparts and grayish upperparts. Males average more richly colored than females, with less white in the face. The following is a link to this photographer's website: http://www.flickr.com/photos/oceanites/.; photographer Brian L. Sullivan

Female American Robin, Braman, OK, 23 October.

Females are generally much paler below than males, often with white mixed into the orange underparts. They also average more white on the head and face. The following is a link to this photographer's website: http://www.flickr.com/photos/oceanites/.

Male American Robin hunting earthworms, Pelican Lake, SD, 7 July.

American Robins frequently forage on the ground, and this bird is in a typical foraging position hunting one of its favored prey items--earthworms. In winter, American Robins shift over to a diet of berries, and large concentrations can form around ample berry resources. The following is a link to this photographer's website: http://www.flickr.com/photos/oceanites/.

American Robin nestlings, PA, June.

American Robins nest in backyards across North America, usually building a cup nest in a shaded tree. The following is a link to this photographer's website: www.flickr.com/photos/31479748@N03/., Jun 15, 2008; photographer barnmom42

Male American Robin, western ssp., Rye Patch Res., NV, 13 April.

Geographic variation is rather limited in American Robin, with western breeders averaging paler overall and with less white in the outer tail feathers. Subspecific field identification is difficult due to the large degree of individual variation. Birds from Atlantic Canada and the Pacific Northwest average darkest overall, conforming with Gloger's Rule. The following is a link to this photographer's website: http://www.flickr.com/photos/oceanites/.

Male American Robin, darker variant, Amherst, MA, 8 April.

American Robins from Atlantic Canada and the Pacific Northwest average darker and more richly colored. This bird is possibly of the Atlantic Canada breeding subspecies, T. m. nigrideus, based on its blackish nape and back that show little contrast with the black head and crown. However, individual variation makes subspecific identification tentative outside known breeding areas. The following is a link to this photographer's website: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uropsalis/.

American Robin, Tompkins Co., NY, 10 April.

While some American Robins are resident in North America, northern breeders are migratory. Huge flocks can form during migration, and around abundant sources of food in winter. Counts of birds coming into evening roosts can number in the millions. The following is a link to this photographer's website: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/.

Male American Robin feeding on honeysuckle berries, Tompkins Co., NY, March.

Berries form a large part if this species' diet during migration and winter., Mar 10, 2008; photographer Gerrit Vyn

Recommended Citation

Vanderhoff, N., P. Pyle, M. A. Patten, R. Sallabanks, and F. C. James (2016). American Robin (Turdus migratorius), version 2.0. In The Birds of North America (P. G. Rodewald, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bna.462